Adoptable Airplanes

At each MAF-US program, we’ve selected an airplane which supporters can “adopt.” One-time or monthly gifts help cover things like ongoing maintenance, unexpected repairs, fuel, and other expenses that help these planes reach isolated people. In return, we provide an update three times a year so donors can stay informed about the impact each plane is having.

Here are a few stories of the way people like you are changing lives around the world through these planes.

In Papua, Indonesia, KODIAK PK-MEA has been bringing food to a community rocked by an unexpected freeze.

PK-MEA brings another load of rice and supplies to Kwijawagi. Photo by Luke Bryant.

PK-MEA brings another load of rice and supplies to Kwijawagi. Photo by Luke Bryant.

Back in early July, the temperature dropped below freezing in the village of Kwijawagi, located at 8,700 feet. It’s the highest airstrip that MAF serves in Indonesia. The sudden freeze killed all of their crops, mainly staples like potatoes and sweet potatoes. Not only are these a main source of food, but they are also a source of income for the people—losing them was a devastating blow.

From July to early September, the people who adopted PK-MEA made it possible for the plane to visit Kwijawagi four to five times a week as she helped deliver 11,000 pounds of rice that was donated by the Indonesian government.

PK-MEA’s adoptive family includes compassionate donors who care for isolated people. And thanks in part to their support, the people of Kwijawagi won’t go hungry.

PK-MCB, known as “Charlie Brown,” is a Cessna 185 floatplane that serves the people living along the rivers of Central Kalimantan—people like Pastor Sukardi.

Pastor Sukardi with his family. Photo by Mark and Kelly Hewes.

Pastor Sukardi with his family. Photo by Mark and Kelly Hewes.

Years ago, Sukardi remembers Charlie Brown visiting his own village when he was just a boy. Back then, the plane was on wheels as it served West Kalimantan and CMA (Christian Missionary Alliance) missionaries who brought the Gospel to his village.

Today Sukardi is a pastor with a church started by CMA, and Charlie Brown traded his wheels for pontoons. Sukarid is now a missionary to his own people and, with the help of Charlie Brown, is ministering in remote, hard-to-reach villages along the central rivers.

Photo by Isaac Rogers.

Photo by Isaac Rogers.

“Personally, MAF has helped me a lot,” said Sukardi. “When I tried to start reaching people with the Gospel in Katingan, they flew me several times to many different areas. Without MAF, it’s very hard to visit the villages.”

Charlie Brown’s family enjoys knowing that they’re making an impact each time the plane reaches a new area with the Good News of Jesus Christ.

This summer, Cessna Caravan 9Q-CMO brought two new doctor-missionary families from Kinshasa to Vanga in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), where they would be serving at Vanga Evangelical Hospital.

Missionaries arrive at Vanga, DRC. Photo by Nick Frey.

Missionaries arrive at Vanga, DRC. Photo by Nick Frey.

Not long afterwards, one of those missionaries, Shannon J. Potter, MD, was doing her rounds in the maternity ward. A medical student was in labor with twins. She wasn’t progressing, even after a difficult day and night of labor. Since the babies were not in distress, Shannon advised the woman to wait until a set time later that day before going forward with a C-section.

Staff and students gathered around the woman and prayed. Friends, family, and the MAF team in Kinshasa also prayed.

God intervened in a miraculous way. The woman had a normal delivery within an hour of those prayers! She didn’t have to face a long recovery from a C-section. Instead, the Caravan was able to take her and the twins comfortably and quickly to Kinshasa, where her husband and the rest of her family live.

Mother and newborn twins with pilot Kevin Spann.

Mother and newborn twins with pilot Kevin Spann.

Simply for the “aww” (or awe) factor—a close-up of the twins. Photo by Shannon J. Potter.

Simply for the “aww” (or awe) factor—a close-up of the twins. Photo by Shannon J. Potter.

Supporters of 9Q-CMO had a hand in missionaries reaching the places they’ll be serving and enabled this mother to reunite with her family so she could have help with her newborn twins.

These are just a few snapshots of our airplanes in action, and the impact their families are making around the world.

Would you like to adopt an MAF airplane? A monthly gift will go a long way toward bringing the Gospel or much-needed help to isolated people. When you adopt a plane, you’ll receive a welcome packet in the mail, with a prayer card and information about your plane and the country in which it serves. Then, you can sign up to receive two email updates a year; you’ll automatically receive a paper update in your mailbox in the fall.

Maybe you have a burden for a certain country, or perhaps you have a preference for a certain type of airplane. There’s probably one that fits your style or interests. Check out all of the MAF Adopt-a-Planes, and take one home today! Well, not really. But we do hope you’ll feel like “family.”

4 Comments

  • Roger Lindeman says:

    I might be interested in a Kodiak.

    • MAF says:

      Hi Roger,

      If you click on “adopt” in the first line of this story, it will take you to a page showing all of the MAF Adopt-a-Planes. There are two KODIAKs listed. Blessings!

      • Roger Lindeman says:

        I signed up to help sponsor a Kodiak, but I can’t find which one I signed up with. I received an email today giving me that info but I can’t find it. I might be interested in also sponsoring the other Kodiak as well. Please send me all the info you have on the two Kodiaks as I can’t seem to find it again.

        Roger Lindeman

        • Roger Lindeman says:

          Kodiaks. Sorry but I still can’t seem to find the info I need for the Kodiaks. The form letter reply I received is not adequate.

          Roger Lindeman

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